OUR STORY

THE COMPANY

New England Fishmongers works to revolutionize the New England seafood industry by promoting sustainable fishing practices and bringing our catch directly to our communities. We believe in creating a closer connection between the consumer and the harvester of the seafood, in an effort to celebrate the natural marine resources we have available in New England. New England Fishmongers gives back to our communities by providing wild-caught fish to NH Food Bank, Gather for Hunger and Our Neighbors Table.

MEET THE MONGERS

New England Fishmongers is run by Tim and Kayla, two commercial fishermen, with the support of a handful of awesome crew members. Tim began his commercial fishing while in college and began selling the catch directly to consumers in response to New England's consolidating fisheries. With the Catch Share system pushing the small dayboat fleet out of business, New England Fishmongers was created in an effort to adapt and overcome. Since there is no "middle-man," local communities are able to reap the benefit of the freshest fish straight from the boat. Tim and Kayla fish throughout the Gulf of Maine, anywhere from two to sixty miles from shore, along with his wonderful crew members. Click on the photos below to learn more about each crew member!

OUR VESSEL

F/V FINLANDER II


The F/V Finlander II is a 47-foot LeBlanc Novi ("Novi" is a nickname for a boat built in Nova Scotia).

Originally built for dragging, we converted this vessel into a jig boat by removing all nets and net reels, and installing rod holders and Icelandic-style DNG automatic jig machines. This is part of an ongoing project in collaboration with other like-minded fishermen around the country, in an effort to reduce our ecological impact while harvesting the highest quality hook-and-line caught fish. We pride ourselves in the Finlander II project as it allows us to be more responsible harvesters of the marine resource and have less impact to the seafloor. ​

Finlander II is also outfitted for scallop fishing and is used to scallop off the northern coast of Massachusetts from December through April each year.